Take Control of Your Health choosing Wisely - Drug Treatment Options

When your doctor recommends a drug, treatment or test, be sure to ask if it's appropriate for you. To help guide your discussion with your doctor, we've included a list of articles below from "Consumer Reports" and other patient friendly groups.

  • Muscle Relaxants
  • Muscle Relaxants

    12/01/2009
    From: Consumer Reports
    Where muscle relaxants could be a good first option is the treatment of muscle spasticity associated with disorders such as cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis or stroke.
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  • NSAIDs
  • NSAIDs

    03/01/2011
    From: Consumer Reports
    This report shows how you could save $135 a month ($1,640 a year) or more if you need to take an NSAID.
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  • Off-Label Drug Use
  • Off-Label Drug Use

    02/12/2013
    From: Consumer Reports
    One in five prescriptions in the U.S. is for a use not approved by the FDA. And most of those (about 75 percent) are for a use that lacks any evidence or rigorous studies to back it up.
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  • Opioids
  • Opioids

    09/27/2017
    From: Consumer Reports
    The weight of medical evidence indicates that while opioids are highly effective and usually the drugs of choice in relieving acute severe pain, they are only moderately effective in treating long-term chronic pain, and their effectiveness can diminish over time.
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  • Painkillers
  • Painkillers

    09/04/2012
    From: Consumer Reports
    If you need a painkiller but suffer from high blood pressure, heart failure, or kidney disease, itís best to steer clear of some commonly used pain relievers.
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  • Prescription Assistance Programs
  • Prescription Assistance Programs

    12/01/2011
    From: Consumer Reports
    Do you need help paying for prescription drugs? You may qualify for a Prescription Assistance Program (PAP). Most drug companies offer PAPs. Some state governments offer PAPs. And there are some PAPs for people with certain diseases or conditions.
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  • Progestogens To Prevent Preterm Birth
  • Progestogens To Prevent Preterm Birth

    09/07/2012
    From: AHRQ
    This summary will tell you about the risk of preterm birth. It also tells you what the research says about the benefits and harms of taking a progestogen to prevent preterm birth. You can use this information to talk with your doctor about whether taking a progestogen is the best treatment option for you.
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  • Reading Labels
  • Reading Labels

    12/01/2011
    From: Consumer Reports
    Your prescription drug comes in a bottle or a box with a label. You also receive written information about the drug from your pharmacy. Both the label and the information sheet tell you important safety information.
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  • Sleeping Pills for Insomnia and Anxiety in Older People
  • Sleeping Pills for Insomnia and Anxiety in Older People

    09/28/2017
    From: Consumer Reports
    Nearly one-third of older people in the United States take sleeping pills. These drugs are called "sedative- hypnotics" or "tranquilizers." They affect the brain and spinal cord. Doctors prescribe the drugs for sleep problems. The drugs are also used to treat other conditions, such as anxiety or alcohol withdrawal. Usually older adults should try non-drug treatments first.
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  • Splitting Pills
  • Splitting Pills

    01/01/2010
    From: Consumer Reports
    Not all pills can be split, so pill splitting cannot be used in the treatment of every chronic disease. But in the face of mounting costs for prescription drugs, many doctors and health authorities are advising this strategy with more and more medicines.
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  • Starting a New Drug
  • Starting a New Drug

    12/01/2011
    From: Consumer Reports
    Every time you get a new drug, make sure you understand why you are taking it and how to take it. Here are six questions to ask your doctor.
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  • Statins
  • Statins

    09/28/2017
    From: Consumer Reports
    There are seven statins, but they're not all the same. Some deliver a greater reduction in cholesterol than others. In addition, some statins are backed by stronger evidence that they may reduce the risk of a heart attack, death from heart disease, or stroke.
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  • Supplements for Osteoarthritis
  • Supplements for Osteoarthritis

    06/25/2014
    From: Consumer Reports
    Many people with osteoarthritis have knee pain. They often try over-the-counter treatments -- chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine -- to help the pain, and to avoid knee surgery. But these popular supplements donít work. Many studies have shown that glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate do not help to relieve arthritic knees.
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  • Taking Your Medication as Directed
  • Taking Your Medication as Directed

    12/01/2011
    From: Consumer Reports
    If you skip doses, take less than the full dose, or stop too soon, the drug may not work properly. Taking too much of a drug can also harm you.
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  • Ten Ways to Reduce Your Drug Costs
  • Ten Ways to Reduce Your Drug Costs

    05/10/2013
    From: Consumer Reports
    Visit the Website
  • Triptans for Migraine
  • Triptans for Migraine

    09/27/2017
    From: Consumer Reports
    If nonprescription pain relievers do not work for you, the next step may be a triptan. But which one? Our report considered all of the available evidence for effectiveness, safety, and side effects, as well as cost.
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  • Type 2 Diabetes Drugs
  • Type 2 Diabetes Drugs

    04/19/2012
    From: Consumer Reports
    You might assume you need medication to help control type 2 diabetes. But lifestyle changes alone can sometimes suffice. And when drugs are needed, the best choice usually isn't one of the newer, heavily advertised ones.
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